September 1st 2016 – New Zealand Day 12

Today I woke up at 4:45am. I didn’t sleep good and kept tossing and turning. I ended up reading for a few hours before making breakfast, and then heading to the Southward car museum, only a few kilometres away. The museum was absolutely outstanding, with over 250 cars and motorcycles dating back to 1895! The facility was immaculate, the cars were immaculate, and attention was made to every little detail. There was also a rather large collection of oil antique containers, signage, model cars, etc. The Southward Car Museum was opened in December 1979 by Sir Len Southward when he realized his collection was becoming too large and needed a place to store it. 

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After spending over three hours at the museum I drove to the town of Foxton, where I walked up and down the Main Street. I came across a gravel parking lot down a short narrow lane with a bunch of old trolley buses from the 1940’s, as well as a pretty rustic building with more inside. I didn’t want to snoop around as it looked deserted and not well maintained, and I didn’t want to impose on private property, even though it wasn’t marked accordingly. It turns out that the owner and his wife unfortunately passed away a few years ago and the place has been left to fall apart, unless someone takes it over. I certainly hope so because the place and the buses have a lot of character.

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I was getting hungry so I made myself a sandwich for lunch before driving onward towards Whanganui, which was a really cool little city. I visited Durie Hill Elevator, which is New Zealand’s only public elevator. It connects Anzac Parade, beside the Whanganui River, with the suburb of Durie Hill through a 205 metre long 3 metre high tunnel. The construction of the elevator started in 1916, and was completed in 1919. The elevator, which is 66 metres tall, also has a flat-topped tower encasing the elevator machinery, and it even has a wrought iron staircase on the outside so you can go on the top to see a view of the city. I paid $4 to do a return trip on the elevator. It was well worth it! The current operator, Zena Mabbot, has been operating it since 1971! She was a very friendly!

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After riding the elevator and taking some photos of the tunnel I walked next door to the war memorial, and walked up to the top. The walk took about six minutes and was well worth it. The views from the top were incredible! There was also many locks that were secured to the top of the structure. Over to the north I saw a water tower, which I wanted to go view next. 

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After driving over to the water tower I was confronted with a disappointing gate leading to the top. The trip to the top wasn’t going to happen, but instead I took a couple of nice photos.

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It was time to find somewhere to stay the night. I had lots of selections, but most had unfavourable reviews, so I settled on the best one, which was in an aquatic centre parking lot next to the highway. 

I actually got an overall good sleep, except for an 7.1 magnitude earthquake at 4:37am, but more on that tomorrow! 

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